SCAMP UPDATES

I started building SCAMP sailboat #225 on May 28, 2013.  The SCAMP is an amazing 11′ 11″ micro-cruiser.  This SCAMP is now fully assembled and For Sale.   If you are interested, email Dan@Hookedonwoodenboats.com.  Thanks!

On this page I am posting Build Updates.  To see the Cost and Time to build the SCAMP, click on  HookedOnWoodenBoats.com/SCAMPCostTime.  Or to see the SCAMP Hacks & Tips click on HookedOnWoodenBoats.com/SCAMPHacks.

 

BUILD UPDATES

October 19, 2013   –   To Date:  208 Hours Worked,  $4,493 Spent _________________
In the 4 weeks since my last update, I have worked 24 hours on Foresail 1 and have finally completed her assembly.  The time was spent installing her cockpit coamings, cabin sides and cleats and cabin top.  These parts are held in place with plywood pads and drywall screws so she can be taken apart for painting, hardware, etc. to be done when she is finished.

I found the cabin side cleats challenging to install and ended up laminating and cutting curved cleats to match the concave curvature of the top edge of the cabin sides.  She has come together nicely and is ready for someone to finish and rig her.

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Cabin top being strapped down for installation.

"Sea Trials" Lake Goodwin :D

“Sea Trials” Lake Goodwin 😀

 

September 19, 2013   –   To Date:  184 Hours Worked,  $4,493 Spent _________________
In the 6 weeks since my last update, I have worked about 80 hours on Foresail 1.  The time was spent planking her, painting the forward stowage area, glassing the transom and bow and bottom, epoxy coating the outside of the boat (3 coats), steaming and installing the carlins and gunwales, installing the deck, cockpit sole and doubler.  I worked really hard on the project as I wanted to have her done for the Sept 6th festival.

She is about 90% assembled now.  Left to do: build rudder, install cabin sides, cabin top and seat coamings.

 

Foresail 1 on Sept 16, 2013. Photo by Wooden Boat Dan

Foresail 1 on Sept 16, 2013. Photo by Wooden Boat Dan

 

July 31, 2013   –   To Date:  105 Hours Worked,  $3,995 Spent _________________
This past week spent most of my time installing cleats for the seats and the cockpit sole and the deck and cabin beams.  So far I have installed 45 cleats and 4 deck/cabin beams.  Of course each piece has to be properly milled first to correct cross section, cut to the correct length (some beveled on ends), and epoxied in place.

I have been avoiding using screws to hold cleats in place while the epoxy is setting up.  Instead I use spring clamps where possible and use my BOSTITCH 23-Gauge Pin Nailer when necessary.  This saves a lot of time as there is no drilling for screws, countersinking, then filling and sanding of the screw recesses.

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Seat cleats being clamped into place.

45 Seat and cockpit sole cleats are now in place.

45 Seat and cockpit sole cleats are now in place.

I installed the deck and cabin beams this week, glassed the outside of the mast trunk where it goes through the cabin top, and work on the centerboard mounting details (bronze spaces, end caps, etc.)  I have a few more fillets to make and one more coat of epoxy to put on cleats and then I will be installing the GARBOARD  – Yeah!!!

 

July 23, 2013   –   To Date:  80.5 Hours Worked,  $3,941 Spent _________________
Since my last post I have been busy attaching all the bulkheads, the seat longitudinals, centerboard trunk, stem, bow panel, and mast trunk to the boat.  And all installed parts have been filleted in place.

Yesterday I spend about 1.5 hours securing B1 to B4 by adding cleats to the kit provided temporary braces (and clamping to same) and I also took the extra step of clamping the stem vertically to a 2 x 4 attached to the ceiling to keep the stem totally plumb and solid until planking is complete (I don’t like stuff moving around).  Here’s pics:

I secured the stem in a plumb position by attaching by clamping it to a 2x4 attached to the ceiling.

I secured the stem in a plumb position by clamping it to a 2×4 attached to the ceiling.

I screwed cleats to the temporary kit guides and then clamped those to the builkheads to secure in exact position for planking, etc.

I screwed cleats to the temporary kit braces and then clamped those to the builkheads to secure the builkheads in exact position for planking, etc.

Before I epoxy any new part to the boat, I ensure the fit is exact (plumb, square, tight) and I make sure I have done all the work that I can on the part I am installing and on the parts that have already been installed.  This includes epoxy precoating, sanding, filleting and beveling where necessary, etc.  I am also considering painting most of  the bilge areas before planking (while the access is still very good).

I assembled the 4 piece mast trunk and filleted the inside corners before installing on the boat.  In lieu of using screws (which have to be recessed, filled, and sanded) I have been using clamps, weights, and my BOSTITCH 23-Gauge Pin Nailer
to hold parts in place during epoxy setup (the pin nailer is awesome as it holds stuff in place with a pin that is .023 inches in diameter) wherever I can.

My fillets are improving!  I am using a pastry tip with zip loc bags.  The tip gives you a little more control over the epoxy, but it does take time to clean after each session.  Here’s a fillet video I made:

 

July 9, 2013   –   To Date:  44.5 Hours Worked,  $3,532 Spent _________________
I have spent most of my time in the last 2 weeks working on building the centerboard.  Starting with the 2 halves that come with the foils kit, I routed out inside cavities for 18 pounds of lead shot, joined the 2 halves, installed 2 layers of fiberglass cloth on each side with one coat of epoxy, then topped off with 2 coats of epoxy (to fill fiberglass) and one coat of epoxy with 25% graphite for the final coat.

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2 piece centerboard joined together after routing out cavity and filling with 18 pounds of lead shot.

Centerboard being prepared for 2 layers of 6 ounce fiberglass cloth.

Centerboard being prepared for 2 layers of 6 ounce fiberglass cloth.

The completed centerboard. She weighs in at 32 pounds total.

The completed centerboard. She weighs in at 32 pounds total.

SCAMP c/b & case

The completed centerboard (middle) and case. Note the case on left also serves as the seat longitudinal.

 

June 22, 2013 ____________________________
I now have all the parts joined together with epoxy.  I enlarged the access holes in Bulkheads 5-7 for easier access the stowage after the boat is assembled.  To keep the bulkheads strong, I left at least 60mm along all edges.  See picture below:

Enlarged access holes in Bulkheads 5, 6 & 7.
Enlarged access holes in Bulkheads 5, 6 & 7.

I have started pre-coating all the parts with epoxy and am about 75% done now.  The idea is that since the entire boat will have 3 coats of epoxy underneath the paint/varnish, it is much easier to apply the epoxy before all the pieces are assembled.  However some parts/sections cannot be coated before installation.  Here are the parts I am applying 3 coats to BEFORE assembly (and there will be more to come!):

  • Inside of all strakes (hull panels)
  • Inside of bow transom (B-1) and stern transom (B-8) except where doubler is attached
  • Inside of transom doubler
  • Both sides of each seat longitudinal except where centerboard mounts (this will be fiberglassed)
  • Both sides of bulkheads 2 to 7
  • Both sides of stem
  • Both sides of mast trunk
Epoxy pre-coated SCAMP parts waiting for assembly.
Epoxy pre-coated SCAMP parts waiting for assembly.

I needed 18 pounds of lead for the center board trunk, so I got creative and bought 25 pounds of exercise weights (like ankle weights, etc.) from a lady on Craigslist for $15.  I cut open the leather pieces and poured out the lead shot into a bucket – Voila!  Now I have the centerboard weight and save about $30.  See photo below:

Here are the exercise weights I cut open to get my 18 pounds of lead. Cost $15 on Craigslist :-)
Here are the exercise weights I cut open to get my 18 pounds of lead. Cost $15 on Craigslist 🙂

 

June 4, 2013 _____________________________
This past week I assembled the jig and began joining the plank parts together with epoxy!

 SCAMP Build Video #1 – Assembling Jig & Prepping Hull Planks for Joining

SCAMP Boat Build Video #2 – Epoxying Puzzle Joints 

 

 

May 29, 2013 _________________________
Picked up my SCAMP boat kit today.  70+ pieces cut to exact dimension on a CNC machine.  Stay tuned to this page as the build progresses!

Hard to believe when I put this all together I will have a very seaworthy microcruising boat!
Hard to believe when I put this all together I will have a very seaworthy microcruising boat like the picture below. Photo by Wooden Boat Dan.
Here's a picture of Josh Colvin's SCAMP #1. This is an amazing boat that is only 11' 11" long! Photo by Wooden Boat Dan
This is what the completed boat will look like (this is the Prototype boat owned by Josh Colvin). Photo by Wooden Boat Dan

 

 

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